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The information below describes the characteristics of Kia's Dual Clutch Transmissions ("DCT"). The information is from Kia corporate. Maybe this will reduce some of the anxiety I have seen posted. Remember this is not an automatic transmission, it is basically an automated manual transmission, which operates a little differently. Some of the unique characteristics of the transmission are described below:

Brand New Cars

As Kia’s DCT is derived from a manual transmission there is an initial bedding in period before the transmission has reached its optimal performance. This bedding in occurs within the first few hundred kilometres of driving or may take a little longer if the vehicle is used primarily for highway driving where gear changes occur less regularly.

During this period you may experience the following:

A slight rattle noise typically when the transmission shifts up a gear. This is the normal sound of the clutch operating.
A slight shudder or vibration as you pull away at low speeds. This is normal and will lessen as the clutch beds in.
When the vehicle is started from cold, the DCT transmission may have a firmer shift until the vehicle reaches normal operating temperature.

DCT Driving Characteristics

Transmission Sound
A subtle double-clicking sound may be heard when the transmission is changing gears, particularly when driving on smooth roads at lower vehicle speeds.

A clicking noise may also be heard from the transmission when the engine is turned off which is the normal sound of the transmission cycling the clutch to the open position, so that it is ready for a safe re-start of the engine.

Vehicle "Creep"
Kia’s advanced DCT replicates the feeling of a traditional automatic. This is noticeable as the vehicle starts to creep forward as you start to release the brake pedal. This allows for a smoother take off. This feature also applies when the vehicle is in Reverse gear.

“Direct” Driving feel
When driving with the vehicle in gear, the transmission is directly connecting the engine to the driving wheels which provides for more responsive acceleration and a more dynamic driving feel. At very low speeds, such as driving in a car park,
this may feel like a slight shunting sensation, especially if the driver is depressing and releasing the accelerator pedal repeatedly. This can be avoided by using a gentler and more consistent accelerator pedal application.

Hill Launch Assist
DCT vehicles also feature an advanced Hill Launch Assist function that assists with taking off on an incline. Unlike manual transmissions where the vehicle may roll back during a hill start, the transmission works together with the vehicle’s
braking system to hold the vehicle stationary for a brief moment after the driver takes their foot off the brake pedal. This provides the driver time to move their foot to the accelerator pedal and smoothly launch the vehicle without the vehicle
rolling backward.
 

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Both the creep, and hill start should rely almost exclusively on the traction motor. The DCT is not normally involved. In no way does this validate jerking in 1% of cars delivered.
 

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Both the creep, and hill start should rely almost exclusively on the traction motor. The DCT is not normally involved. In no way does this validate jerking in 1% of cars delivered.
There’s the serious jerking in a very small percentage of cars that this doesn’t validate.

There’s the “low speed lurch” in 100%(?) of vehicles that it does. Doesn’t mean anyone has to like it, but it does mean they acknowledge it and don’t consider it an issue. Interesting that they said it gets less over time. I thought I’d just leaned to avoid it but perhaps it has gone away. I’ll have to fight my instincts to test it out again.
 

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Low speed lurch? Can you describe further? The major low speed thing I notice is trying to move a controlled couple inches in my garage. That is hard! All electric crawl function.
 

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Low speed lurch? Can you describe further? The major low speed thing I notice is trying to move a controlled couple inches in my garage. That is hard! All electric crawl function.
Yes it sounds like the same thing. It's when you're moving at a very low speed and the engine has gone into neutral, if you give it a little gas it can 'lurch'/'surge' forward.

If you want to move forward in your garage a couple inches (or in a parking spot) it would be better just to take your foot off the brake, but don't touch the gas either, and let it idle forward. Once it starts to move forward (e.g. you're out of neutral), you can give it some gas, but if you do it before the 'gear has engaged' (forgive me if that's not the right term) then you're prone to lurch/surge forward..

I *was* able to repeat this at my parking spot at work today despite having ~4200 miles on the car so it did not go away. But it did not happen as much as stop signs along my route where I tried to test it, so it may be leseer.
 

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I'm not touching the throttle. The crawl function is set too high and it is a very delicate balancing act on the brake only to go a couple of inches. It has been years since I've driven a standard automatic, but what I remember is you can go a half an inch at a time simply by releasing the brake a little.
 

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I recently parked forward on a hill behind another car. I left ample room in front but did not expect to get hemmed in from behind. It took 3 maneuvers to get out, one forward one backward and again forward. Because of the hill, removing foot from brake would do nothing while in reverse. I gently pushed the accelerator and it lurched backwards unexpectedly. Luckily I was quick to release the gas before it collided, but I was shocked at the lurching.
 

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I've been shocked by it too. It is a bit unnerving. Doesn't happen often to me, but when it does, it always reminds me to keep a healthy distance from the car in front--in traffic jams, at red lights, etc. Also experienced it once in reverse, backing out of my garage. I'd say it is the one thing I would change about the car, if I could. Otherwise I really enjoy the Niro.
 

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NiroDudeSF --- Thanks for the Post. Interesting and I can now understand better that a Dual Clutch is sort of a manual transmission.

Quote from Post.
As Kia’s DCT is derived from a manual transmission there is an initial bedding in period before the transmission has reached its optimal performance. This bedding in occurs within the first few hundred kilometers of driving or may take a little longer if the vehicle is used primarily for highway driving where gear changes occur less regularly.
Quote ended.

Only word I can think of is abbreviated to BS.

Not that I have been overly concerned about the jerking, shutter, whatever you call it on my NIRO. Normally, it is not extreme, other times feel more of it, and sometimes not at all. That is with 13,800 miles on the car.

I do notice the problem with quick lurching FWD when trying to move a short distance during say parking operations (let off brake and there is a quick acceleration). Never had a situation where I thought that was a danger (like the guy had trying to maneuver out of a tight spot between cars), but I can see how it could be.
 

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I don't think either (well actually three) clutches in the Niro have anything to do with this. It is the programming and physical operation of the traction motor causing these issues. But they are correct in saying that a new clutch could use a few miles (most don't) and can exhibit jerkiness. But this has nothing to do with initial movement forward or back in the Niro. That is all traction motor, not the engine. The electrically operated DCT is engaged and fully in gear in these forward and back initial starts. The hydraulic clutch that engages the ICE is not in action yet.
 
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