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Discussion Starter #21
734 miles on a single tank today! Turns out I could have safely made it to 760 miles, but I'm not ever going to try to beat this result - unless I do a trip on a road like the Natchez Trace Parkway with a 45 mph speed limit.

Took two months since my last fill up, but conditions were optimal virtually for every trip. Warm, almost no inclement weather, and per my usual practice, never exceeded 65 mph. This also gave me a personal best tank mpg of 59.46 (topped off and calculated) with 25,000 miles clocked. Display was extra optimistic this time with an estimate of 64.6 mpg (also a tank best but irrelevant).
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I don't document that but I think the low gas indicator comes on at about 40 miles displayed range left. I've already documented that there is about 70 miles range remaining when range indicator is zero. In this specific case, I went 37 miles past the point where displayed range was zero. Just like the GOM, real world results vary, so 70 miles below "empty" is not golden so I played it safe, along with other variables like an available low cost gas station. Now that I have a good handle on actual range, I don't need to actually run out of gas. Having a 700 mile range (in the summertime) is fantastic! That halves my gas station stops over my last car. 734 miles is just for bragging, 700 is my target.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
So I didn't really try to run out of gas today, but I almost did! Cabin fever sent me out of Ohio to Knoxville, Atlanta (where I picked up wheel covers - the excuse for the trip), Biloxi where the beaches were still open for some sun and a swim in the Gulf, New Orleans where I once lived, and back home via the full Natchez Trace Parkway (which I haven't driven for over 35 years). 444 miles long with a 50 mph speed limit. Thought that might be a good test of maximum mpg. And indeed it would have been if the weather had stayed hot and dry as was predicted for the next two days. Instead, this massive storm moved really fast dropping the temperature from the 80's to the low 50's and causing adverse cross winds. Between New Orleans and Natchez with the weather in the 80's displayed mpg was 75 mph over 100 miles.

Bought gas $1.05 in New Orleans. Would have been easy to fill up in Nashville at 640 or so miles at the end of the Natchez Trace Parkway, but the price was $1.70 to $1.99 a gallon, by far the most expensive I saw on the entire trip (except for parts of Atlanta). So I kept going north in heavy rain - keeping speed to a true 55 mph max to continue the mpg test. Managed to make it to a $0.93 a gallon station in Elizabethtown Kentucky at 784 miles! 62.26 mpg. Both numbers a personal best by a good amount.

Topped off with 12.592 gallons, leaving only about a 2/10 gallon reserve! I was nervous about making it, but there was a station every 6 miles on the last stretch easing my stress somewhat. Distance traveled below range zero was 45 miles - I've done 61 miles below "empty" in the past, and based on my reserve gas this time, that is the about max for sure. About $35 for gas for the entire round trip. Perhaps 2,300 miles (didn't note my starting odometer).

Just goes to show how low speeds with low aero drag can overcome (relatively) cold temperatures and rain. I did have a good direct tailwind for the last couple hours in the rain. I now think 70 mpg going slow in ideal conditions is possible without extreme hypergliding. Tough to drive that slow of course, but I was in no rush. The Natchez Trace Parkway or the Blue Ridge Parkway are ideal places to drive slow and still have fun and try for maximum mpg.

Those are the numbers to beat: 784 miles on a tank, and 62.26 mpg on a full tank. Someone living in a hot climate can certainly beat it if they have the patience to drive that slow on a long trip.
 

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Wow! Our gas prices are still above $2.50/gallon. People like to say it's "CA taxes" but they are really only about fifty cents more than the lowest taxed state.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
CA has a different sort of "tax", strict fuel formulations and not as many refineries capable of the standards perhaps (so I've heard) as other states. Arco seems to have some monopoly power. The cost of real estate and the cost of living drives up most prices including gas in California.

I noticed the lowest gas price yesterday was in Wisconsin at 78 cents a gallon! But even 93 cents a gallon is a price I haven't seen for decades. Inflation adjusted, it probably beats the 18 cents a gallon I remember my parents paying around 1964 - at a special "truck" pump for our VW microbus.
 

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Not sure why this urban legend has persisted for so many generations. Your fuel gets pumped from the very bottom of the tank regardless of what the fuel level is. If there's sediment in there, it's getting sucked up whether your tank is empty or full or anywhere in between. That's what we have fuel filters for.
I agree but the pickup for the gas does not touch the bottom of the tank for that very reason - the sediment can sit there and never be sucked up. Once a car gets older and miles pile up, the sediment can begin to approach the end of the tube depending on many factors out of your control, such as quality of fuel, dirt entering when filling etc.
What is a greater concern is the tank in the ground where you purchase your fuel. If the tanker is filling that underground tank at the same time you are filling your tank, you are at a much greater risk of getting sediment in your fill up as the tanker is churning up the sediment on the bottom of the underground tank.
The filter in your gas tank should never need to be replaced under normal circumstances. Filters in today's vehicles have a much larger surface area than fuel filters from carbureted cars such as the 80's.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
And yet, documented issues with sediment in gasoline are incredibly rare. It is certainly not because owners pay the least attention to this. I'm at least aware which most owners are not, but I also don't worry about it even slightly. No matter where the intake in the tank is, eventually if sediment is a real problem, it will hit the fuel line. Gas tanks are pretty good at stirring things up while driving. I know this from personal experience from many miles on a 67 Triumph motorcycle going cross country. The inlet tube sticks up about a quarter inch or so from the bottom of the tank and when starting to run out, an intermittent splash of gas over the top of the tube gave the engine a bit more life. Range was rather short so I ran out a lot.
 

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And yet, documented issues with sediment in gasoline are incredibly rare...
Yeah, this is one of those "I heard about a guy who had a friend who's brother's cousin..." things. Unless you are filling your tank with gas you bought from a 1 pump station 5 years ago and kept in an old paint can you probably won't have an issue with sediment. Same applies to water in diesel fuel. If you drive at all regularly and don't fill up from the rusty tank behind your barn you'll never have a problem with modern fuels.
 

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Yeah, this is one of those "I heard about a guy who had a friend who's brother's cousin..." things. Unless you are filling your tank with gas you bought from a 1 pump station 5 years ago and kept in an old paint can you probably won't have an issue with sediment. Same applies to water in diesel fuel. If you drive at all regularly and don't fill up from the rusty tank behind your barn you'll never have a problem with modern fuels.
I agree, I know this post is kind of old but my other vehicle is an '03 Ford Ranger 4x4 4.0L Edge and it used to be my old work truck. I work with lakes and ponds so this truck has been taken off road, over curbs, and launched boats where there are no boat ramps, crazy angles. Giving it a generous low average I figured it has been shifted into 4x4 at least 13,000 times in it's life. It's been ran low on gas many times in it's life and just recently I had to replace the fuel pump and decided to do the fuel filter at the same time. The factory made it through a ton of abuse for 249,000 miles.

I'm not sure how much fuel pumps have changed over the years but they seem to be able to handle some abuse for a long time. Now that I own it, I won't let it get much below a quarter tank before filling it up. My Niro is still very new to me so I am sort of softly testing the limits of exactly how much fuel I have left when it gets down to one bar of fuel remaining and when that bar runs out, but once I get through my trials, I will keep to not letting it get much below a quarter/ one eighth of a tank before refueling. It's just so awesome to be able to go a whole week without stopping at a gas station, I LOVE IT!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Given that it is summer with increased use of the motorcycle (79 mpg) and the lockdown, it was over two months before I bought gas recently. Was still nursing the remaining 93 cent per gallon tank for special occasions only. Like rain!
 
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