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I know the 2018 Niro PHEV has a lot of software and apps on the screen, but i have yet to find anything that will tell me how many miles i've driven on gas?
i started keeping a handwritten mileage tracker and monthly fill-ups, and about 79% of my miles are driven on pure electric mode. so should i can my motor oil after just 1000mi or less of driving?

thanks
gary
 

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I know the 2018 Niro PHEV has a lot of software and apps on the screen, but i have yet to find anything that will tell me how many miles i've driven on gas?
i started keeping a handwritten mileage tracker and monthly fill-ups, and about 79% of my miles are driven on pure electric mode. so should i can my motor oil after just 1000mi or less of driving?

thanks
gary
I wonder the same thing. It would be nice to have an mile or hour meter for the ICE but clearly that's not a feature that's in great demand. Maybe there's a PID available over the OBD-II bus with that info? I haven't seen anybody mention it, so maybe not.

Anyway, after the first couple of oil changes I settled on a 10k change interval. Like you, most of my miles (maybe 75%) are on battery so unless it's cold and the ICE is running to warm the cabin the oil probably has many less miles than that on it at 10k. 10k for me is ~6 months so I'm OK with that. Oil is cheap and I do the change myself so it doesn't cost me anything besides a jug of 0W20 and a filter.

When you get right down to it, even for a regular ICE vehicle a 10k change interval is probably serious overkill. I know guys with VW TDIs that go 20k+ between oil changes. Now, most of them do regular oil analysis so they know how the oil is doing over that span, but the fact remains modern oils, especially synthetics, have a very long service life. Maybe if the price of oil jumps significantly I'll rethink how often I change it but until then I'll stick with what I'm doing.
 

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I have a regular HEV and I only did 4128km on the vehicle in the past 6 months, but in order to keep up with the factory defined service schedule, I had to replace my oil today. That is the stupid side of the manufacturer's maintenance plan, it says milage/time whatever comes first. So my wife had driven her Niro actually more than I had so her 6month change was at 6053km. So she got closer to the optimum wear vs time equation.



Should I get bothered as we have two big dance competitions in the next month where I will generally drive, putting on an extra 700km for one of them and 1500km for the other. Now since I was under the allowed km for the first oil change, according to KIA I can't make the distance up on the next change. I drive far less in the winter time than I do in the summer. The Winter is covered in the severe conditions section, but technically the summer months are not, but KIA doesn't allow you to only be severe part of the time.
 

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My 2018 PHEV is just shy of 9 months old with just under 2,500 miles on the odometer. I drive mostly locally on electric. I'll be making a service appointment in three months at the one year mark with the closet Kia dealership to our home (1.5 hr drive one way). I'll probably have the oil changed and ask the technicians to perform any recommended interval inspections and ask about any available computer updates. I also hope to determine if this dealership is going to be a good fit for me. I also own a nearly 20 year old Hyundai Elantra that has been serviced over the years by a Hyundai dealer across the street. They've been very good so I'm hopeful I'll have the same quality of service with the Kia dealership.
 

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If you keep a running total of how many times you charge the PHEV, you now can estimate very closely how many EV miles you have driven. Multiply by 27 miles or whatever you think you get on average per charge, subtract from total miles and you have ICE miles. EV miles in hybrid will be less than 10% of those ICE miles if you want to further refine estimates.
 

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I've been thinking about this question too. There are some reasonably cheap hour meters that you can purchase from various suppliers, including Amazon. Most of them want you to wrap a sensor wire around one of the spark plug wires so that it can detect when the ICE is on. Some even do bluetooth communication to an app on your cellphone. But I haven't found any that I felt completely enthused about.


I had my oil changed today, at 6 months and about 2500 miles. It definitely felt like overkill. But!... The oil was a little discolored, we need to take into account that the ICE can be called on to start and begin delivering power instantly and then shut off, and then repeat that whole cycle, while it's cold, maybe several times a day, depending on your driving habits. So maybe the six months factor isn't really overkill even if most of your miles are electric, because the ICE is used in a very different way relative to a conventional car. Even more importantly to my way of thinking: Kia is currently having problems with certain other models, due to engine fires. Some of these problems have been associated with manufacturing debris left in the engine, that went on to cause other kinds of problems. While there are no reports (that I'm aware of) to suggest that the Niro's ICE might be suffering from problems with manufacturing debris in the engine, getting the first couple of oil changes done on schedule at six months and 12 months (regardless of mileage) might be a really good investment in the future reliable behavior of your car.
 

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I just ordered an inductive hour meter. I will put it on my ICE and report back.
It was only $10. I've pissed away more money on worse stuff...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the replies for this issue. i was hoping we were not the only ones.
It's my wifes car that she drives 12mi to work and gets free charging from her Co.
But we do use it about once a week to drive to my son's school about 25mi away. With no charging available there.
So there are about 14k after a year of total miles.
What i don't really understand is why Kia would not give free upgrades(software) to everyone that owns one of their cars. if you want to keep your customers then do right by them. Just look at the Tesla model, you don't even need to take it to a shop to get the updated software and sometimes it's substantial upgrades. That could be one reason Tesla folks are so happy with their purchase.
Just think if Kia updated the regen braking on the Niro PHEV and you went from 26mi on battery to 30. it would be like getting a new car all of a sudden.
Don't get me wrong i like our Niro, but we have never seen another one near us, unlike the Model 3 that is everywhere here now.
thanks
gary
 

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Or android versus iPhone. One has easy updates, one doesn't. Business model, not original cost.

I guess it depends on what you want to call easy. The LG G7-one is OTA upgrades direct from Google, so it that the Android phone that you are talking about with the EASY UPDATES? I have given up trying to keep my iPad up to date with apple. it just makes it run slower and slower and twice the update failed mid way and I ended up losing a whole load of data. Apple wasn't too helpful with solving it either. Guess everything comes from your own point of view and experiences.
 

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I just ordered an inductive hour meter. I will put it on my ICE and report back.
It was only $10. I've pissed away more money on worse stuff...
Yeah, I want to hear how it works for you. Please do post an update after you've had a chance to play with it. And if you really like it, let us know which model you purchased.


Thanks for all the replies for this issue. i was hoping we were not the only ones.
It's my wifes car that she drives 12mi to work and gets free charging from her Co.
But we do use it about once a week to drive to my son's school about 25mi away. With no charging available there.
So there are about 14k after a year of total miles.
What i don't really understand is why Kia would not give free upgrades(software) to everyone that owns one of their cars. if you want to keep your customers then do right by them. Just look at the Tesla model, you don't even need to take it to a shop to get the updated software and sometimes it's substantial upgrades. That could be one reason Tesla folks are so happy with their purchase.
Just think if Kia updated the regen braking on the Niro PHEV and you went from 26mi on battery to 30. it would be like getting a new car all of a sudden.
Don't get me wrong i like our Niro, but we have never seen another one near us, unlike the Model 3 that is everywhere here now.
thanks
gary
I'm not hopeful that any other manufacturer will be playing that same game that Tesla plays of adding features for free, via software updates, after your purchase. Maybe in time the more traditional manufacturers will recognize that they need to begin competing with Tesla in this regard, but for now, they don't seem to have reached that conclusion.



I took my Niro in earlier this week for its first oil change. It was a little more than six months since I purchased the car, but I work from home and don't have a daily commute, so mileage was only about 2500. There was a temptation to wait for higher mileage. Weighing against that were multiple considerations:

  1. With any brand new car, it's likely to be a good idea to have the very first oil change sooner, rather than later, due to concerns about possible "debris" in the engine left over from the manufacturing process or the break-in process.
  2. Kia (and Hyundai) are currently under investigation for problems (with other models) that have led to engine fires. Some of the coverage on those problems has pointed to a problem with manufacturing debris left in the engine, that went on to cause secondary problems that gave rise to engine fires.
  3. Even at 2500 miles, my oil was noticeably discolored: more than I would have expected given that I tend to go for weeks at a time without ever starting the ICE (I drive a PHEV and can go for weeks on just EV power before I have a long enough drive that requires me to start the ICE, or encounter other conditions such as the need for heat or the need for exceptional acceleration, which also require the ICE power).
  4. Unlike a conventional car, the ICE in a PHEV is confronted with some extreme service conditions: it's expected to be able to start and begin delivering power on a moment's notice, and then potentially shut off shortly after that. And then maybe start again a few minutes later, run for a few seconds, and shut off again. As the saying goes: "wash-rinse-repeat". It depends on how you drive. But in general, an ICE is at it's best when it's warm and at it's worst when it's cold. When it's cold, it requires more fuel, which is burned less efficiently, and there's a greater that the unburned fuel will wind up in the oil, rather than going into the exhaust system.
Where I come out is that even if you're doing 1000 miles/month but most of those miles are electric, so long as some significant fraction of them are on the ICE, you probably need to stick with the conventional oil change plan (the every six months aspect) until such time as you no longer have a concern about complying with warranty requirements or taking the best possible care of your car.
 
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