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yes. f=ma a=f/m Torque is force. Torque accelerates you.

HP= torque x rpm /5252

Torque multiplied by rpm returns horsepower. Basically, the faster the crankshaft spins with the same amount of force, the more power an engine will make. A car with more hp than torque will always be quicker since this gives a car acceleration and speed.
example

Normal (high mpg) mode
Engine: Torque 100, Rpm 2000
Gear ratio 1:1
Wheel: rpm 2000, torque 100

Sport (high acceleration) mode
Engine: Torque 100, Rpm 4000
Gear ratio 2:1
Wheel: rpm 2000, torque 200

Sport mode doubles wheel torque (doubles acceleration).
 

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Susan, if your question is about enjoying a spirited drive(beat on it) on a hilly country two lane, as I do I'll add, I'd use a different vehicle. The Niro handles very well especially with 18" wheels but that's not what this car was built for.
I find Sport mode's peppier response and verve useful and safer for accelerating on to a busy crowded highway or passing someone on a two lane. It's like Popeye ate a can of spinach.
In NY state they have a bunch of old parkways that were made for 40-50 mph back in the day. Now on a busy weekend the roads are crowded, 65-70mph is the norm and some of the on-ramps are a dainty 30ft or so and steeply uphill. Good luck slipping into the flow in hybrid mode. S makes it much less death defying and as I get up to 50 or more I'll put it back into D and leave it there.
Also I'll have to contradict one poster who mentioned using Sport for engine braking. I find there is no noticeable difference in 'engine braking' as such between D or S. You must use the brake coming down a steep hill to control speed. Whatever 'eng' braking there is is from the motor harvesting energy back to the battery. Stepping on the brake increases the harvesting ergo braking.
 

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Torque multiplied by rpm returns horsepower. Basically, the faster the crankshaft spins with the same amount of force, the more power an engine will make. A car with more hp than torque will always be quicker since this gives a car acceleration and speed.
Quicker? Not in the engineering texts.
 

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Cannot provide a link for an engineering term that doesn't exist. How do you define "quicker" in context of your post? Words like quick or fast are relative descriptors (for which context is needed), not definitions or standard terms.
 

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Heres a bit of info I discovered today during my boring commute:

In 6th gear ECO (normal driving mode) at 63MPH with cruise control on, my tach reads roughly 2060 to 2090 rpm.
Shifting into Sport mode at that speed changed the tachometer by exactly zero rpms. I did it several times under varying road conditions to be sure.

Secondly, accelerating from a stop in Eco mode, with the transmission in 3rd gear, the tach showed roughly 1700 rpm.
Sliding the lever into Sport mode immediately raised the rpms to 2200 and I accelerated much quicker.

All of those torque/HP calculations with doubling rpms are fine, but the real world driving doesn't behave like that.

Also, 2000rpm on the tach does not equal 2000 rpm at the wheels. The Niro does not have a 1:1 gear and there is a 3.23:1 final drive ratio.

Edit:. On my ride home, I tried the same thing except for no cruise control, just keep the same speed at 63 mph and around 2070 rpm. Every time I switched to Sport Mode, the rooms went up 500 rpm. I tried it several times and got the same results.

Looks like some kind of logic built in that only activates Sport Mode when cruise control is off.

Guess we really don't drive these things, the computer does.
 

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example

Normal (high mpg) mode
Engine: Torque 100, Rpm 2000
Gear ratio 1:1
Wheel: rpm 2000, torque 100

Sport (high acceleration) mode
Engine: Torque 100, Rpm 4000
Gear ratio 2:1
Wheel: rpm 2000, torque 200

Sport mode doubles wheel torque (doubles acceleration).
Heres a bit of info I discovered today during my boring commute:

In 6th gear ECO (normal driving mode) at 63MPH with cruise control on, my tach reads roughly 2060 to 2090 rpm.
Shifting into Sport mode at that speed changed the tachometer by exactly zero rpms. I did it several times under varying road conditions to be sure.

Secondly, accelerating from a stop in Eco mode, with the transmission in 3rd gear, the tach showed roughly 1700 rpm.
Sliding the lever into Sport mode immediately raised the rpms to 2200 and I accelerated much quicker.

All of those torque/HP calculations with doubling rpms are fine, but the real world driving doesn't behave like that.

Also, 2000rpm on the tach does not equal 2000 rpm at the wheels. The Niro does not have a 1:1 gear and there is a 3.23:1 final drive ratio.
dude, it was an example to illustrate a point not the actual numbers of the Niro.

"Sliding the lever into Sport mode immediately raised the rpms to 2200 (from 1700) and I accelerated much quicker."

Proves my point. Higher revs with lower gear increases wheel torque thus faster acceleration.
 

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Cannot provide a link for an engineering term that doesn't exist. How do you define "quicker" in context of your post? Words like quick or fast are relative descriptors (for which context is needed), not definitions or standard terms.
here's the physics
F=ma
HP=torque x rpm /5252
Wheel torque = engine torque x final gear ratio
Car acceleration = ~ wheel torque / mass

I'm not sure what your point is.
 

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You still haven't defined your use of the word quicker. What exactly did you mean? You must have had some point in mind with all your bolded words. Especially after you asked me for a link demonstrating that quicker is not an engineering term.
 

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So when you use sport mode do you just move the ignition to the left and do not shift?
This stuff is all in the owner’s manual. Kia also has a YouTube channel with a vid about it. Search for Kia Sportmatic transmission. If you just want to know how and when to use it those sources can be better than here where you’re apt to get a dozen or more different opinions, many of which are bound to be subjective and conflicting.
 

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2019 Niro PHEV EX Premium
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Heres a bit of info I discovered today during my boring commute:

In 6th gear ECO (normal driving mode) at 63MPH with cruise control on, my tach reads roughly 2060 to 2090 rpm.
Shifting into Sport mode at that speed changed the tachometer by exactly zero rpms. I did it several times under varying road conditions to be sure.

Secondly, accelerating from a stop in Eco mode, with the transmission in 3rd gear, the tach showed roughly 1700 rpm.
Sliding the lever into Sport mode immediately raised the rpms to 2200 and I accelerated much quicker.
Perhaps there's different programming in the PHEV. If I pull away from a stop in sport mode, the engine revs far higher than it would with a "normal" auto trans, and I'm unwilling to wait and let it shift itself. Since I see no purpose to revving the engine so high under normal conditions, I manually upshift at around 1500 RPM or so. This is my basis for stating the transmission does not behave "normally" in sport mode. On reasonably flat terrain, there's no purpose to winding the engine out, unless you're in a drag race.

If I switch to sport mode on the freeway (it's the only way I can see the tach) my engine RPMs are in the same ballpark as yours. Of course, I switch back to Eco and the engine turns off, as the PHEV can maintain freeway speeds under EV power easily. I've never tested it to see at what speed the engine would start on its own, as I haven't had a ticket in over 40 years, and don't want one now. :)
 

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My daughter, who has no desire to learn how to drive a manual and this is basically the first car she’s driven figured out that putting the car in Sport mode gives it a little more “oomph”. She doesn’t use it to shift on her own. She employs it when merging onto the highway or changing lanes.
 

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What? How exactly does the Niro perform this feat? Certainly not any stock Niro.
Again, I gave an example to illustrate a point. The numbers don't refer to the niro.

However, most cars will accelerate ~2x faster (quicker) with the ice turning at 4000 rpm then when it is turning at 2000 rpm. Hybrids are different. They also a motor helping.
 

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Again, I gave an example to illustrate a point. The numbers don't refer to the niro.

However, most cars will accelerate ~2x faster (quicker) with the ice turning at 4000 rpm then when it is turning at 2000 rpm. Hybrids are different. They also a motor helping.
So how much does the motor help?

Hev and phev motor has the same torque spec, 125, but the hev produces 43 hp and the phev produces 60 hp.
How can this be? It's the same motor. The hev is spec'd to 1800 rpm while the phev is spec'd to 2500 rpm.

Hp = torque x rpm / 5252

125 x 1800 / 5252 = 42.8

125 x 2500 / 5252 = 59.5

The phev with it's much larger battery can drive the motor harder.
 

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You still haven't defined your use of the word quicker. What exactly did you mean? You must have had some point in mind with all your bolded words. Especially after you asked me for a link demonstrating that quicker is not an engineering term.
quicker = more/higher/better acceleration?
 

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quicker = more/higher/better acceleration?
Sorry, cannot answer a question about what you meant. But all those new modifiers have no more precise meaning than quicker. You still haven't explained what you meant. Since you cannot, giving up asking for simple clarification.
 

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I know this has generated a lot of replies, but I'd like to give it a try.

There are two aspects to Sport Mode on my Niro Plug-In.

Automatic sport mode (my term) is when you press the shift lever to the left and leave it alone. And S shows up in the instrument panel. This changes the feel of the car in a number of subtle ways that makes it more lively: the throttle seems more responsive, the engine revs more freely, and the car feels like it wants to be driven "hard" or faster. If the Eco mode the engine would have shifted at, say, 3,000rpm, the engine now wants to shift at 3,500 or 4,000rpm. There's more noise since the engine is turning faster, but its still the same old engine with pretty modest horsepower. You can get more horsepower, though, since the engine is running at more revolutions, more of the time.

Frequently, shifting to Automatic sport mode causes the transmission to downshift, depending on how much you're pressing on the accelerator and how close the car is to selecting a lower gear (meaning that if the speed were to have slowed, you're closer to dropping down a gear).

Because the average speed of the engine is higher, the gas mileage will deteriorate if you continue to use this mode. But, if you feel you can't keep up easily on a long grade, it allows the car to keep up with (most) other cars.

The second part of Sport Mode is Manual sport mode (again, my term). A number, indicating which gear you're in, shows up in place of the S. This is when you pull the gear shift back to downshift, and you press the gear shift forward to upshift.

(I continually forgot which was which, without looking, until I realized that in an automatic transmission, Drive is closer to the dashboard than 2 or L, and this is preserved in the Niro.)

This gives you control over the gear you are using, and therefore the speed at which the engine turns for a given highway speed. It allows you to go "through the gear" like a sports car driver, albeit without using the clutch. It's a little smarter than that, however, since it won't allow you to damage the car with too low, or too high RPMs.

I use it primarily on hills so that I stay in 4 or 3, and the transmission doesn't "hunt" for the right gear. You can use it downhill as well, but the Niro doesn't provide much compression to slow the car. You're better off in HEV or EV mode, with a gentle touch on the brake to maximize the regeneration effect.

Finally, and most of us know this from experience, if you simply jam the throttle to the floor in ECO mode, you get most of the advantages of Sport mode. The engine will climb to higher revolutions, and the car will accelerate faster for merging or passing.

I hope this is helpful and not too repetitive.

Chuck Hawley
2019 NIRO Plug-In with about 9,000 miles.
2014 BMW i3 with 65,000 miles.
 

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I use it primarily on hills so that I stay in 4 or 3, and the transmission doesn't "hunt" for the right gear.
My experience with other auto transmissions is sparse. However I certainly have experienced gear hunting in those cars. But never in my Niro. In fact, I've mostly been amazed at how long it holds a gear on a hill - far longer than I would have in a manual shift car. Yet because of the EV assist, it is able to hold the set speed. Sure it downshifts if set speed starts to drop, but never seen back and forth hunting.

Now almost all my miles are on cruise control. I do notice the car algorithms are different in manual versus CC, so I'm not denying that hunting could happen in manual mode in some circumstances, just that I've not experienced it in 40,000 mile in mine - with several cross country trips. Another caveat to my experience, I have a maximum speed of 65 mph. Can certainly visualize different behavior trying to maintain 75 mph up a long grade.
 
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