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I would venture to say that there are many cars out there that are decades old that have never had a brake fluid change, I've got one sitting in my driveway. I'm sure a great many cars go from manufacturing plant to junk yard without a single brake fluid change. Neither the Niro EV owner's manual or service manual even mentions regular intervals for brake fluid replacement.

Both the Niro EV owner's manual and service manual do identify regular intervals for "inspecting" brake fluid. Basically "inspecting" the brake fluid means taking the top off the master cylinder and looking at the brake fluid. In addition to verifying the fluid level you have to look closely at the color.

The worse thing that can happen to the brake system fluid is for someone to put in the wrong type of fluid. The wrong fluid is detectable by two different colors in the fluid. The wrong fluid will react with all the rubber components of the brake system and you will have to disassemble all the brake system components and replace all the O-rings, rubber plungers, etc.

The second worse thing is water contamination. Water contamination will be evident by a milky color brake fluid. Water contamination is usually corrected by replacing the master cylinder cover gasket and flushing the brake system.

The least worse thing that can happen to brake fluid is just old age. When brake fluid is new, it is clear or almost clear but the fluid gets darker as it ages. If your brake fluid is very dark you may want to replace it.

So if you take your car into the shop and the shop recommends brake fluid replacement, be wary. Do your own brake fluid "inspection" and see if you concur with the shops diagnosis. It sure wouldn't hurt to know a little about what good brake fluid looks like and it may just save you an unnecessary charge at the mechanic shop.
 

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Different manufacturers have different standards for brake fluid replacement intervals, ranging from as often as every two years to actually never.
Kia/Hyundai recommends regular inspections only and replace only if needed.

Dealers and independent service shops will definitely try to sell you one, despite any recommendation to the contrary - and opinions are all over the map.
Go with the manufacturer recommendation.
 

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Considering all the more the actual brakes are used in a Niro, I'd expect the change interval to be extremely long. That actually goes for all modern hybrid and electric vehicles that rely on regenerative braking.
 

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Brake fluid absorbs moisture, and no system is perfectly sealed. That is the purpose for changing recommendations. But I'll be the first to acknowledge that I've never changed my fluid on any car. But I would still think it would be a good idea to change brake fluid after 4-5 years. Moisture in the fluid can cause rust to form on the surfaces it touches. And since in a hybrid/EV those brakes don't work as hard as a standard car, it could build up faster. I would expect a shorter, not longer, lifespan for brake fluid in a hybrid/EV.
 

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Probably should change it, but never have on any car. Thinking back I did a gravity drain change on a motor home.

However, my MCs have a sight glass on master cylinders to show level. It also shows fluid getting dark (moisture). It's easy to change on a MC, just open master cylinder and crack bleed on caliper and keep master cylinder full while it drains. Drain until fluid looks reasonably clear (not dark).
 

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Brake fluid absorbs moisture, and no system is perfectly sealed. That is the purpose for changing recommendations. But I'll be the first to acknowledge that I've never changed my fluid on any car. But I would still think it would be a good idea to change brake fluid after 4-5 years. Moisture in the fluid can cause rust to form on the surfaces it touches. And since in a hybrid/EV those brakes don't work as hard as a standard car, it could build up faster. I would expect a shorter, not longer, lifespan for brake fluid in a hybrid/EV.
I don't believe how much you use the brakes should effect fluid change interval. I agree that absorbed moisture does. I live in Florida, a very humid climate and I have always changed brake fluid every 3 to 4 years. Probably over maintaining. I have had the experience on an older car bought used of having replaced brake pads stay locked against rotors due to corrosion in the cylinder so that enough heat is generated to melt seals, so corrosion can be a problem. I have flushed fluid in my 2018 plug in Niro (60,000 miles) But probably won't do it again and probably won't need to change brake pads until 200,000 at the rate they are wearing.
 

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My thought was that hybrids and EVs use their brakes far less, so the hardware has more opportunity for corrosion to begin. Brakes that are in constant use have more motion within the calipers and other movable parts. Whether that translates into an opportunity for faster formation of corrosion, I can't say for certain. It's one reason VW went with drum brakes on the rear of the ID.4, because of corrosion forming on brake parts that are little used.
 
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